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Tuesday, June 14, 2016

Ancient Fingerprints

click on photos to enlarge
On Saturday we drove down to Durham, NC to tour Stagville Plantation. In its day Stagville was the biggest plantation in North Carolina with 30,000 acres and 900 slaves. The slaves made their own cabins and the bricks for their fireplaces. In the photo above you can see fingerprints where the slave picked up the brick which was not yet entirely hardened...

another...

and another...

Now this one...can you make out the little tiny toes...it appears a toddler ran over the top of this brick while it was still hardening...this one steals my heart...

You can see the chimney there that I took these photos from.

For more info on Stagville, visit their website HERE

More pictures to come!

Linking with Tom's Tuesday's Treasures





20 comments:

  1. These ancient fingerprints document the hard time of slavery as a small memorial to future generations. Thank God, times have changed.

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  2. I was in Greensboro GA recently and a friend showed me some slave made bricks in an abandoned home. Very interesting.

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  3. It is amazing how much we can see when we stop and look. Kind of the theme for my post, today, too. Stay cool!

    Janis
    GDP

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  4. You did a great job with this post today. So very interesting. My ancestry home has a few slave built things still standing. Next time I go there I will look at it a little differently. Wish I could say they had no slaves but that is not the case. Thankful that has changed. Blessings.

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  5. Love the toe prints. My Dad had us do the same in cement floors and sidewalks of our home. Perhaps these were also intentional for a happy memory of a little child. I can just hear them giggle in the innocence of the moment.

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  6. Tanya, this gives a whole new meaning to "hand made." It's amazing how things were made back then. Thanks sharing and I hope to see more of your Virginia treasures/

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  7. Neat gives a whole new meaning to hand made bricks

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  8. Oh my goodness! What an amazing piece of history! Almost living history. But it is also so sad!! The fingerprints of the poor slaves who had to build these, and the tiny toddler prints. You find THE most interesting things!

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  9. Very moving. Thanks for sharing these.

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  10. So interesting. I've never thought of bricks in their wet stage before. I don't know why...

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  11. Very thought provoking post.

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  12. You are so observant. If the bricks can speak, they will have lots of story to tell us.

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  13. Thanks for sharing photos of this past history.

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  14. Fascinating, Tanya. It certainly brings to life some of the darker pages of our history!

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  15. What a great look back in history as that chimney was being built. Enjoyed the photos very much.

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  16. Lovely series, I like to search the tracks of the people, who made the things too...

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