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Thursday, September 19, 2013

Inside The 1620 English Farmhouse

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Ok, I'm going to break the rules and post a few of the inside of this gorgeous old place. I showed you the outside HERE

In this photo we are getting a lesson of how life was on the farm.

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I am in love with these windows!

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Here we can see how they numbered the house when they dismantled it in England, to reconstruct here in Staunton, VA! And that allows me to link with Signs, Signs right? ;)

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Watch your step!

"English colonization of North America began with the founding of Jamestown in 1607. Over the next century other English colonies were established along the Atlantic coast of what would become the United States. By 1700, almost 250,000 people, most of whom were born in England or were of English descent, lived in the colonies.

Virginia was England’s first North American colony, and as many as 120,000 English migrants arrived here in the 1600s. Some colonists were granted land where they established tobacco plantations worked by white indentured servants and African slaves. Settlement slowly crept westward into the piedmont, and by the mid-1700s Anglo-Virginians crossed the Blue Ridge and began to settle in the Valley of Virginia."

Read more HERE

16 comments:

  1. those steps are too small. i think folks were tiny-ier or smaller back them ... we are too tall now. that could hurt. ouch!! ha. ha!! ( :

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  2. We have steps in the back of our farm house like that. If you use standard stairs it takes up most of a small room to do them. I enjoyed looking at the interior views, thanks.

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  3. Wow! Life wasn't easy back then. Pretty neat how they really packed up their house from the old world though!

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  4. What fun! Wouldn't it make a great Bed & Breakfast?! :)

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  5. The house looks so cozy. Love it! Great shots, Tanya.

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  6. I love all the wood and stone work inside the house. So pretty!

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  7. LOVED seeing the inside! Can you imagine how they must have stayed warm in winters? No small feat!:)

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  8. my fav is the last one...the stair case. Great shot!

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  9. One of the great benefits of visiting historic homes is to remember once again that people living today have it so much easier than even the wealthiest people living then.

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  10. I love those windows, too! The ceiling downstairs look so low. I think I would feel a bit claustrophobic inside. :-)

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  11. I have really missed your wonderful posts. So glad to be back. I put together my signs post, but I cannot figure out how to link up with Lesley's blog. This is what happens after months of being without a computer and being offline. Any suggestions. My last picture is of the coffee sign, but it is NOT tilted and cute like yours. I did make reference to your blog and put a link so if people did not remember your photo they could bop over and see it. Hope all is well. genie

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  12. It's a very cosy looking house, that's for sure. Great shots!

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  13. Amazing- that's old even by English standards ;-)

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Hi! I'm so happy you've stopped by and always enjoy your comments :)